Top 9 Pet Insurance Plans For Boxers (2022)

iHeartDogs is reader-supported. When you buy via links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission at no extra cost to you.

Boxers are beautiful dogs with a distinct look and a finely-toned physique. They’re tough dogs for sure, but Boxers are also cheerful companions who love their families. And while they’re a sturdy dog ​​breed, Boxers do come with their own set of health problems that can wreck your bank account when you’re least expecting it. Treating severe conditions like spinal issues, heart problems, and cancer can be overwhelming to your finances and heart.

While pet insurance can’t stop illness or injury, it can give you financial peace of mind when you only want to focus on helping your pup heal. Paying just a little a month can save you big on vet bills. And with a solid plan in place, you’ll never be forced to make hard choices because of financial restrictions. To help you find the best pet insurance plan for your Boxer, we’ve created a free and easy-to-use comparison tool to simplify your life.

Compare The Top 9 Pet Insurance Plans for Your Boxer Using our Free No-Obligation Quote Tool below

The simplest way to compare pet insurance prices is to use our tool below. The comparison tool will show you quotes from the top 9 pet insurance carriers, including Trupanion, Pets Best, Lemonade, ManyPets, FIGO, HealthyPaws, Prudent Pet, Spot, and Embrace pet insurance.

How Much Does Pet Insurance for a Boxer Cost?

Below are some sample pet insurance plans for a 1-year-old male Boxer using the zip code 75001 (Texas) as an example.

Ultimately, your plan’s premium will depend on several factors, including your dog’s age, size, and breed, as well as where you live. You also want to know what type of coverage your plan has and if it will help with Boxer-specific health problems. Let’s get more into those medical conditions and how much you can expect to pay to treat them.

pet insurance for boxers

Common Health Problems Associated With Boxers

Degenerative Myelopathy (DM)

Degenerative Myelopathy is a neurological condition that usually starts with weakness in the rear legs. Affected Boxers are typically older and progress to total paralysis in the back legs as this spinal cord worsening disease over time. According to Boxer Dog Diaries, Degenerative Myelopathy commonly occurs in Boxers due to a “widespread” genetic mutation in the breed.

Cancer

The UK Kennel Club reports cancer is one of the most reported health problems in Boxers, with an estimated 38.5% of the breed passing away from some form of the disease. Due to breed makeup and complicated environmental factors, Boxers have an advanced risk for benign and malignant tumors. The breed also possesses higher rates of brain tumors and mast cell tumors than others.

RELATED: What Every Boxer Parent Needs To Know About Cancer

Spondylosis

Dr. Patty Khuly, VMD MBA, defines Spondylosis as a chronic spinal disease in which bone spurs form at the edges of the vertebrae, and spurs can even create “bone bridges between the vertebral segments.” Some dogs never show symptoms, but those that do exhibit problems like limping, back pain, stiffness, and muscle wasting.

Boxer Cardiomyopathy

Boxer Cardiomyopathy occurs due to an electrical issue in the heart muscle, which causes an irregular heartbeat. The irregularity can cause fainting, congestive heart problems, and even sudden death. Veterinarians can detect irregular heartbeats during exams, making vet checkups even more critical for your Boxer.

RELATED: This Heart Condition Is So Common In Boxers, It’s Actually Named For Them

Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism is another common health problem in Boxers and occurs when the thyroid doesn’t produce enough hormones to regulate metabolism. This condition often presents with fatigue, weight gain, coat problems, and flaky skin. Left untreated, your dog’s entire quality of life will decline.

Typical Costs Of Treating Health Issues In Boxers and How Pet Insurance Can Help

Taking your dog to the vet for annual visits is a bill you expect. But when the vet discovers a problem or the onset of an illness strikes suddenly, medical bills can stack up fast. With the right pet insurance plan for your Boxer, you’ll be financially ready to deal with any bills, leaving you to concentrate on your best friend’s recovery.

Take a look at what it costs to treat the five common health issues in Boxers mentioned above:

  • Degenerative Myelopathy Costs: While DM typically isn’t a painful disease, it is one that needs monitoring. To diagnose and keep tabs on the degeneration, your Boxer might need expensive scans, which can cost as little as $150 per X-ray, or if an MRI is required, you could be looking at a bill of $5,000 depending on where you live. And with no definitive treatment for DM, vets often prescribe physical therapy and hydrotherapy to keep Boxers feeling their most robust. Costs for these treatments average $50 per session.
  • Cancer Costs: When cancer is suspected, diagnostic costs for bloodwork, scans, and exploratory surgeries can range from $200 to more than $1,500. Once the diagnosis comes, the treatment begins, and costs start mounting with surgery that averages $1,500, radiation prices of $2,000-$6,000, and chemotherapy costs that can run up to $5,000 depending on severity. Additional prescriptions can average $50 monthly.
  • Boxer Cardiomyopathy Costs: If your Boxer deals with this heart condition and suffers a sudden collapse, emergency treatment will be necessary. Emergency vet visits start at an estimated $100 and can quickly climb with the administration of life-saving treatments like oxygen therapy which can cost anywhere from $1,000 – $3,000. Overnight stays at the hospital can tack on another $1,000 per day.
  • Spondylosis Costs: To diagnose Spondylosis in your Boxer, the vet might recommend X-rays, or an MRI, which you already know can get pricey. If your dog suffers from painful Spondylosis, they may require a monthly prescription for NSAIDs or other pain relievers that will cost anywhere from $20 – $100 per month, depending on your dog’s size and pain level. Physical therapy is another option for treatment, but surgery may be needed when the disease grows too severe. And surgery on the spine can cost anywhere from $3,000 – $5,000.
  • Hypothyroidism: Hypothyroidism is typically treated with medication and monitoring. Depending on your Boxer’s size and the severity of the issue, you’re looking at $20 – $50 per month to fill your dog’s script. That might not sound like much to start, but month after month, year after year, prescriptions for hypothyroidism can add up over time.

What Is Pet Health Insurance, And Why Do I Need It For My Boxer?

pet health insurance works very similarly to human health insurance. Your policy quote will range in monthly price, depending on your dog’s breed, age, and where you live. Typically, you’ll spend around $15-$110 per month as a pet parent.

Pet insurance is mainly about peace of mind, knowing you won’t be totally overwhelmed in case of an emergency. Enrolling even when your dog is young and healthy will ensure you have plenty of coverage when they need expensive medical care later. If you choose a plan more suited to your dog’s particular breed, you’ll be more prepared when something happens later on in their life.

pet insurance for boxers

Some plans cover accidents and illnesses, while others only cover accidents. Certain plans do cover breed-specific illnesses, and others do not. It all depends on what type of coverage you choose. With our free pet insurance comparison tool, you can get quotes from multiple insurance companies with no obligation to commit.

Whatever plan you choose, you’ll feel better knowing you can take care of your dog when they need you most. Plus, you won’t suddenly have to shell out thousands of dollars. Learn more about how pet insurance works here.

Pet Insurance Carrier Comparisons

Breed Pet Insurance

Pet Insurance by Location

iHeartDogs is reader-supported. When you buy via links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission at no extra cost to you.

Leave a Comment